Tameka's Story

By ensuring access to the treatment and recovery supports that are proven effective, recovery is accelerated and the further harm related to the course of illness is minimized.

Recovery

Recovery can mean many different things. Some people see recovery as going back to their daily life before signs of a health problem. Other people see recovery as learning to live well, contributing to a community, and building relationships despite the challenge of a health problem. At CFI, recovery is a process or journey rather than a single end goal.

Our supportive services can help you on your way—no one should ever have to follow their journey entirely on their own. Our team of professionals and supports can guide you, provide help and assistance, celebrate your victories, and back you up when you need it.

Some people worry about asking for help because there can be stigma around mental health problems. Some people worry about how others might see them. Asking for help means that you want to make changes or take steps towards your new health goals. At CFI, we celebrate the courage it takes to speak up and make changes. Getting help is part of recovery.

Hope Promises a Future Reward
The wonderful thing about hope is that it promises a future reward. What do you need to be rewarded with? Acceptance?  Understanding?  These things do exist. Many people living with mental illnesses find them through supportive services provided by Community Friendship, Inc.
Mental illness doesn't have demographics. It doesn't have socio-economic boundaries. Mental illness can affect anyone. ​At CFI, people find comfort and a team of caring professionals working for them. With our assistance, they learn that mental health recovery is an exercise in hope. Hope is indispensable to recovery. We believe that hope can help individuals move away from the terror of defeat and despondency. It’s the cornerstone upon which the entire recovery foundation is built. There can be no recovery without it.

Finding Hope

Facing years of scrutiny and bullying in special education, Michael found comfort in his relationship with his older brother. Though his parents would endure several diagnoses', years passed before 


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Michael's Story

After dropping out of school at 16 years old, Tameka did not see the value in expressing her emotions. She carried them deep inside-unwilling and unable to share them with those who care about her.  Multiple hopitalizations and 


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Getting Help

Living in a society that prides itself on self-sufficiency, the idea of asking for help can often be daunting.  The ability, though, to ask for help can sometimes be life saving and the inability to do so can lead to many unnecessary consequences.